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Graduating High School Students Face Even Greater Uncertainty In the Wake of COVID-19

So far, the events of 2020 seem expressly designed to illustrate, in glaring detail, the racism inherent in our public policies. Similar to the devastating health impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic being skewed wildly towards low-income people and people of color, the educational impacts of the pandemic also disproportionately affect these communities.  We are only beginning to grapple with the issues facing high school students as their pathways to postsecondary education and into the workforce are being blown up by the pandemic. 

Equitable Distribution of Postsecondary Funds

The COVID-19 global pandemic has sent higher education into a period of uncertainty. States and institutions are grappling with the effects and are adapting policies to maintain student supports and instruction.

The Digital Divide Has Never Been More Critical, or Solvable

The COVID-19 pandemic is continuing to upend most of our seminal institutions, including the K-12 education system. Since schools around the country started closing down in mid-March, more than 54 million students have transitioned to distance learning. As a current graduate student, my classes also have gone online, and we are expected to complete assignments and attend class just as we did before.

Eliminating the “Balance Wheel Metaphor” in the Wake of COVID-19

The COVID-19 crisis has produced record levels of unemployment, disrupted student learning on an unprecedented scale and laid bare the structural racism that leads to highly inequitable outcomes in areas such as health, education and economic opportunity. Even before the current crisis, today’s students and workers learned in all kinds of ways, places and contexts. In the aftermath of COVID-19, that will be even more true as they pick up the pieces by taking classes online, enrolling in institutions that are new to them, pursuing short-term credentials such as digital badges and taking jobs that offer embedded training.

Empowering Today’s Learners and Workers with Due Credentials

The COVID-19 crisis has produced record levels of unemployment, disrupted student learning on an unprecedented scale and laid bare the structural racism that leads to highly inequitable outcomes in areas such as health, education and economic opportunity. Even before the current crisis, today’s students and workers learned in all kinds of ways, places and contexts. In the aftermath of COVID-19, that will be even more true as they pick up the pieces by taking classes online, enrolling in institutions that are new to them, pursuing short-term credentials such as digital badges and taking jobs that offer embedded training.

Focusing on Equity in Crisis

As we adjust to what many are referring to as our “new normal”, I can’t help but reflect on my experiences as a postsecondary leader during Hurricane Katrina. Understanding that Katrina impacted a specific region, like the 911 attack and the Flint water crisis, there are still lessons learned that can assist postsecondary leaders and policymakers across the country in responding to this present crisis.

The Silver Lining: Distance Learning Can Strengthen Parent-Teacher Partnerships

Over the past few weeks, like many graduate students around the world, I’ve found myself with some extra time on my hands. Instead of socializing and commuting to class, I have been focusing on the intense impact that COVID-19 has had and will continue to have on education.

Addressing Equity Concerns as College Instruction Goes Remote

When it became evident that the coronavirus pandemic would hit home, U.S. colleges and universities acted swiftly to keep their campus communities safe. With the spring 2020 term in full swing, institutions moved quickly to brace technology systems and faculty for the jump to remote instruction. This mid-stream shift was truly seismic, and we are just beginning to understand its ripple effects.

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